Lines of Questioning: FAQ

I thought it would be useful to share the answers to some questions that have come up while playtesting Lines of Questioning:

Q. Some tiles have two entrances and two exits/arrows. Do I need to go “straight” from the entrance to the arrow across from it?

A. Nope! It’s OK to turn and place the next tile using the other arrow.

When there are multiple exits, you only have to use one . . .
When there are multiple exits, you only have to use one . . .
. . . and you can change directions rather than following your previous path
. . . and you can change directions rather than following your previous path

Q. Regarding the tiles with two entrances: do they need to have arrows pointing to both exits in order to place them?

A. No; choose one to use to keep the line going, and ignore the other.

Tile 3 is legal; it is not necessary for both entrances to be used
Tile 3 is legal; it is not necessary for both entrances to be used

Q. Can I keep a line going by “bouncing” off the edge of the board with a diagonal arrow?

A. Yes! It’s perfectly OK, and often tactically useful, to do this. In fact, it can be required for the witness’ tiles; sometimes this will be a way to keep the witness’ line going.

Tile 2 is a valid way to continue the line from tile 1
Tile 2 is a valid way to continue the line from tile 1

Q. The difference between how the lawyer’s tiles and the witness’ tiles are placed is kind of confusing.

A. For both, you have to keep the line going if you currently can. When putting down a tile from the lawyer’s hand in Step 1, it is OK to choose a tile that will make it impossible to keep the line going next turn. When putting down a tile from the witness’ hand in Step 3, you must–if possible–choose a tile that currently leads to at least one space where the witness will be able to play next turn. If none of the tiles in the witness hand will do that, you can choose any of the tiles in the witness hand to play.

These diagrams show some common (and not-so-common) situations, and how they work:

10-24-14 - Lines of Questioning - Choice of Tiles 1If this is the lawyer’s hand, you could play A or C. A will end the line of questioning by running into the edge of the board, but that’s fine.

If this is the witness’ hand, you must play C. The diagonal exit makes it possible for the witness to continue into space 3. You would have to play C even if you did not already have a tile like B that could continue the line; it is enough that C leads to a space where the line could theoretically continue.

10-24-14 - Lines of Questioning - Choice of Tiles 2The lawyer in this example is almost stuck–but has one of the witness’ answer tiles in her hand. Since answer tiles can play over question tiles, you must continue the lawyer’s line of questioning by playing the answer tile (D) in space 1. You must do this even though it will necessarily end the line of questioning.

10-24-14 - Lines of Questioning - Choice of Tiles 3None of the tiles in the witness’ hand can be used to extend the line into space 3 such that the witness will have somewhere to play the following turn. You still have to continue the witness’ line of answers into space 3, but can choose which tile to play.

On the next turn–assuming no answer tile is played that makes continuing the witness’ line possible–start a new line for the witness in the corner with the number tile you are currently working to claim. (Yes, it’s legal to choose tile A so as to guarantee that it will not be possible to continue the witness’ line. Shifting the lines around the board is part of the fun!)

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